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By Anna Rebecca Lopez, AR Lopez Consulting

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(Introduction text)

A group of BIPOC fundraisers and nonprofit professionals began a collaboration to build a movement for racial and economic justice, sharing dreams of a world beyond capitalism and the nonprofit industrial complex. To gauge perceptions of nonprofit fundraising, this group distributed a survey in May 2019. Intended to highlight the thoughts and experiences of fundraisers and presented through a series of infographics, here are some findings from over 2,000 fundraisers and nonprofit professionals surveyed. 

TAKEAWAY #1

(The following section is visualized through a brown box wrapped around the following text:)

Nearly all nonprofit professionals (93%) think nonprofits needs to support one another more.

(The next subsection features bar graphs in multiple colors, showing what survey respondents answered in response to “In terms of nonprofits supporting one another’s fundraising efforts.”)

In terms of nonprofits supporting one another’s fundraising efforts,

63% said “I think nonprofits need to support one another significantly more”

31% said “I think nonprofits need to support one another slightly more”

6% said “I think nonprofits are currently supporting one another at just the right amount”

0.2% said “I think nonprofits need to support one another slightly less”

0.3% said “I think nonprofits need to support one another significantly less”

TAKEAWAY #2

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The majority of nonprofit professionals want more trainings on a variety of topics that relate to identity and lived experiences.

(This next section is visualized through two horizontal line graphs stacked on top of each other, one of BIPOC survey respondents, and the other graph is of white survey respondents. Both graphs are colored in dark green, pink, yellow and indigo. The charts show what survey respondents think regarding training on race.)

(The BIPOC graph)

84% said “I think fundraisers in general need significantly more training on race”

12% said “I think fundraisers in general need slightly more training on race”

3% said “I think fundraisers in general have the right amount of training on race”

1% said “I think fundraisers in general have more than sufficient training on race”

(The white graph)

75% said “I think fundraisers in general need significantly more training on race”

22% said “I think fundraisers in general need slightly more training on race”

3% said “I think fundraisers in general have the right amount of training on race”

0% said “I think fundraisers in general have more than sufficient training on race”

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Additionally, 95% of fundraisers want more trainings on race, 95% want more trainings on disabilities, and 94% want more trainings on LGBTQIA and LGBTQIA identities.

And while trainings are a first step in understanding concepts and dimensions of identity, they are not enough. The 2020 Race to Lead (Revisited) report shows that increased awareness of diversity and equity issues is not actually leading to measurable change. 

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Kerrien Suarez, Executive Director of Equity in the Center, acknowledged that trainings are important and useful, but “[it’s the] transformation and the anti-racist action inside of organizations that will make progress toward equity.” 

Edgar Villanueva, author of Decolonizing Wealth, said that DEI initiatives are often seen as “add-ons,” as a way of checking a box. He reminds us that DEIA should be woven into the fabric of the organization…and it’s going to take time and commitment. 

Margaret Mitchell, CEO & President of YWCA Greater Cleveland, said that “…racial equity needs to be recognized as a core ‘leadership acumen,’ particularly for those who want to lead an organization in 2020 and beyond.”

TAKEAWAY #3

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An avenue to shift the field in ways that are more equitable includes engaging with donors. Over half of folks, regardless of racial identity, think more attention should be focused on individual donors.

(The next subsection features bar graphs in multiple colors, showing what survey respondents answered in response to “Regarding the attention focused on individual donors.”)

Regarding the attention focused on individual donors,

24% said “I think nonprofits need  significantly more attention on donors”

29% said “I think nonprofits need  slightly more attention on donors”

25% said “I think nonprofits have right amount of attention on donors”

18% said “I think nonprofits need  slightly less attention on donors”

4% said “I think nonprofits need  significantly less attention on donors”

(This next section is text. It says:) 

However, while folks think more attention should be focused on individual donors, donors are not who fundraisers are most loyal to. BIPOC fundraisers think their primary loyalty should be to the people their organizations serve, more so than their white counterparts. 

(This next section is visualized through two horizontal line graphs stacked on top of each other, one of BIPOC survey respondents, and the other graph is of white survey respondents. Both graphs are colored in dark green, pink, yellow and indigo. The charts show who survey respondents think fundraisers should be most loyal to.)

(The BIPOC graph)

54% said “Fundraisers should be most loyal to the people their organizations serve”

32% said “Fundraisers should be equally loyal to donors, nonprofits, and community members”

12% said “Fundraisers should be most loyal to their organizations”

1% said “Fundraisers should be most loyal to donors”

(The white graph)

43% said “Fundraisers should be most loyal to the people their organizations serve”

45% said “Fundraisers should be equally loyal to donors, nonprofits, and community members”

12% said “Fundraisers should be most loyal to their organizations”

1% said “Fundraisers should be most loyal to donors”

(This next section is text. It says:) 

In a CCF Summit held in August 2018, BIPOC fundraisers shared what they would like to see change in the field of philanthropy. Themes included:

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  • Increasing collaborations across organizations
  • Educating donors, funders, and boards
  • Sharing knowledge, resources, and tools
  • Increasing diversity and representation among donors
  • Shifting of power dynamics
  • Increasing BIPOC-led collective efforts
  • Gathering spaces for BIPOC nonprofit professionals
  • Valuing and elevating BIPOC voices and experiences
  • Accessible grant application processes
  • Re-defining success and impact metrics
  • Increasing unrestricted giving 
  • Nonprofits as part of the community

WHO WAS SURVEYED?

The 2019 survey asked over 2,000 respondents to self-identify their race and/or ethnicity. Respondents were able to select multiple options of the list provided and were able to write-in races and/or ethnicities not provided in the options. The majority of respondents identified as white (84%), this included respondents who identified as Caucasian, Jewish, and/or European. Of the 16% of respondents who identified as BIPOC, this also included individuals who self-identified as coming from ‘mixed ancestry’ or ‘multi-racial.’ 

(Here, there is a dark indigo pie chart showing that 84% of respondents were white and 16 percent of respondents, shown as a pink wedge, were BIPOC.)

(Next to the BIPOC percentage, there is deeper-dive information. There is a breakdown of ethnicities of respondents who were surveyed. The list is shown as a bar graph in descending order, from highest percentage to smallest percentage. The list says:)

Latinx and/or Hispanic – 31%

Asian/Asian American – 29%

African American/Black/of the African diaspora – 22%

Native American/Indigenous/ First Nations – 8%

Arab American/Middle Eastern – 6%

Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander – 4%

South Asian/Indian – 1%

(The next section shows the percentage of donors who are BIPOC in a multi-colored bar graph, as answered by BIPOC respondents and white respondents.)

When it came to identifying donors as BIPOC, nearly half of BIPOC respondents (44%) and over half of white respondents (57%) said 10% or less of their donors identified as Black, Indigenous, or as a Person of Color.

1-10%

BIPOC – 44%

white – 57%

 

11-20%

BIPOC – 28%

white – 28%

 

21-30%

BIPOC – 9%

white – 10%

 

31-40%

BIPOC – 4%

white – 3%

 

41-50%

BIPOC – 5%

white – 1%

 

51-60%

BIPOC – 2%

white – 1%

 

61-70%

BIPOC – 3%

white – 0%

over 70%

BIPOC – 6%

white – 0%

(The very bottom of the infographic shows the CCF logo on the left hand side. On the right hand side, it says: “© 2021 Community Centric-Fundraising”)

This infographic is the fourth and final part of a multi-part series. Read part one, two, and three of the series here.

This infographic is part of a multi-part series. Read part one of the series here. Read part two of the series here. Follow CCF on Instagram, Facebook, or sign up for our mailing list to get notified of the next part!

Anna Rebecca Lopez

Anna Rebecca Lopez

Anna Rebecca Lopez (she/they) is an experienced Evaluator and consultant, using mixed-method approaches to social science research, statistical analysis, community engagement & collaboration, digitization and more. She is the Principal Evaluator at AR Lopez Consulting, where she specializes is disaggregating data in a way that tell authentic and useful stories. You can find her on IG @anna_.rebecca

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